Nebraska Revised Statute 60-6,148

Chapter 60

60-6,148.

Preferential right-of-way; stop and yield signs.

(1) Competent authority may provide for preferential right-of-way at an intersection and indicate such by stop signs or yield signs erected by such authorities.

(2) Except when directed to proceed by a peace officer or traffic control signal, every driver of a vehicle approaching an intersection where a stop is indicated by a stop sign shall stop at a clearly marked stop line or shall stop, if there is no such line, before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection or, if no crosswalk is indicated, at the point nearest the intersecting roadway where the driver has a view of approaching traffic on the intersecting roadway before entering the intersection. After having stopped, such driver shall yield the right-of-way to any vehicle which has entered the intersection from another highway or which is approaching so closely on such highway as to constitute an immediate hazard if such driver moved across or into such intersection.

(3) The driver of a vehicle approaching a yield sign shall slow to a speed reasonable under the existing conditions and, if required for safety to stop, shall stop at a clearly marked stop line or shall stop, if there is no such line, before entering the crosswalk on the near side of the intersection or, if no crosswalk is indicated, at the point nearest the intersecting roadway where the driver has a view of approaching traffic on the intersecting roadway. After slowing or stopping, such driver shall yield the right-of-way to any vehicle in the intersection or approaching on another highway so closely as to constitute an immediate hazard if such driver moved across or into such intersection.

Source

  • Laws 1973, LB 45, § 37;
  • R.S.1943, (1988), § 39-637;
  • Laws 1993, LB 370, § 244.

Annotations

  • At four-way stop signs, no driver has a preferred or favored status, and all have a duty to stop followed by a duty to use ordinary care as they proceed through the intersection. Salazar v. Nemec, 253 Neb. 298, 570 N.W.2d 366 (1997).