Nebraska Revised Statute 43-1514

Chapter 43 Section 1514

43-1514.

Emergency removal or placement of child; appropriate action; hotline representative; duty.

(1) Nothing in the Nebraska Indian Child Welfare Act shall be construed to prevent the emergency removal of an Indian child who is a resident of or is domiciled on a reservation, but temporarily located off the reservation, from his or her parent or Indian custodian or the emergency placement of such child in a foster home or institution, under applicable state law, in order to prevent imminent physical damage or harm to the child. The state authority, official, or agency involved shall insure that the emergency removal or placement terminates immediately when such removal or placement is no longer necessary to prevent imminent physical damage or harm to the child and shall expeditiously initiate a child custody proceeding subject to the provisions of the Nebraska Indian Child Welfare Act, transfer the child to the jurisdiction of the appropriate Indian tribe or tribes, or restore the child to the parent or Indian custodian, as may be appropriate.

(2) During the course of each intake received by the statewide child abuse and neglect hotline provided by the Department of Health and Human Services, the hotline representative shall inquire as to whether the person calling the hotline believes one of the parties involved may be an Indian child or Indian person. If the hotline representative has any reason to believe that an Indian child or Indian person is involved in the intake, the representative shall immediately document the information and inform his or her supervisor.

Source

Annotations

  • The lower standard of proof under subsection (3) of section 43-279.01 for the termination of parental rights to non-Indian children, as opposed to the higher standard of proof under the Nebraska Indian Child Welfare Act does not violate the equal protection rights of parents of non-Indian children. In re Interest of Phoenix L. et al., 270 Neb. 870, 708 N.W.2d 786 (2006).