Nebraska Revised Statute 29-106

Chapter 29 Section 106

29-106.

Code and other law; construe according to plain import of language.

This code and every other law upon the subject of crime which may be enacted shall be construed according to the plain import of the language in which it is written, without regard to the distinction usually made between the construction of penal laws and laws upon other subjects, and no person shall be punished for an offense which is not made penal by the plain import of the words, upon pretense that he has offended against its spirit.

Source

  • G.S.1873, c. 58, § 251, p. 782;
  • R.S.1913, § 8906;
  • C.S.1922, § 9927;
  • C.S.1929, § 29-106;
  • R.S.1943, § 29-106.

Annotations

  • 1. Construction

  • 2. Miscellaneous

  • 1. Construction

  • Penal statutes are inelastic, must be strictly construed, and are never extended by implication. Macomber v. State, 137 Neb. 882, 291 N.W. 674 (1940).

  • Railway car is a "building." Hardin v. State, 92 Neb. 298, 138 N.W. 146 (1912).

  • Where statute is adopted from another state, construction by courts of that state is ordinarily followed. State v. Martin, 87 Neb. 529, 127 N.W. 896 (1910).

  • There are no common law crimes in this state; common law definitions may be resorted to only where statute designates crimes in general terms. Kinnan v. State, 86 Neb. 234, 125 N.W. 594 (1910).

  • Language, capable of two constructions, is not construed to make an otherwise innocent act criminal. Gilbert v. State, 78 Neb. 636, 112 N.W. 293 (1907).

  • In construing a statute, words should be given usual meaning. State v. Byrum, 60 Neb. 384, 83 N.W. 207 (1900).

  • Violation of the very letter of law is essential to convict. Bailey v. State, 57 Neb. 706, 78 N.W. 284 (1899).

  • Statute providing how penalty, previously created, may be recovered is not penal and need not be strictly construed. Albion Nat. Bank v. Montgomery, 54 Neb. 681, 74 N.W. 1102 (1898).

  • 2. Miscellaneous

  • Where defendant requested instruction reciting statute, he could not complain. Lovings v. State, 158 Neb. 134, 62 N.W.2d 672 (1954).

  • Prosecution for violation of city ordinance is civil proceeding when offense is not made crime by statute. Peterson v. State, 79 Neb. 132, 112 N.W. 306 (1907).

  • There can be no punishment for act not made penal by plain import of statute. State v. De Wolfe, 67 Neb. 321, 93 N.W. 746 (1903); Moore v. State, 53 Neb. 831, 74 N.W. 319 (1898).

  • "Original code" refers to code of 1873. Richards v. State, 65 Neb. 808, 91 N.W. 878 (1902).

  • Legislature intended to abolish hypertechnical rules of common law. Burlingim v. State, 61 Neb. 276, 85 N.W. 76 (1901).