Nebraska Revised Statute 17-120

Chapter 17 Section 120

17-120.

Public morals; powers; restrictions.

A city of the second class shall have the power to restrain, prohibit, and suppress houses of prostitution, gambling and gambling houses, and other disorderly houses and practices, and all kinds of public indecencies, and all lotteries or fraudulent devices and practices for the purpose of obtaining money or property, except that nothing in this section shall be construed to apply to bingo, lotteries, lotteries by the sale of pickle cards, or raffles conducted in accordance with the Nebraska Bingo Act, the Nebraska Lottery and Raffle Act, the Nebraska Pickle Card Lottery Act, the Nebraska Small Lottery and Raffle Act, or the State Lottery Act. The city may license, regulate, or prohibit billiard halls and billiard tables, pool halls and pool tables, and bowling alleys.

Source

  • Laws 1879, § 39, I, p. 201;
  • Laws 1881, c. 24, § 1, p. 194;
  • R.S.1913, § 5014;
  • Laws 1917, c. 99, § 1, p. 263;
  • C.S.1922, § 4183;
  • C.S.1929, § 17-122;
  • R.S.1943, § 17-120;
  • Laws 1986, LB 1027, § 189;
  • Laws 1991, LB 849, § 62;
  • Laws 1993, LB 138, § 64;
  • Laws 2017, LB133, § 16.
  • Effective Date: August 24, 2017

Cross References

  • Nebraska Bingo Act, see section 9-201.
  • Nebraska Lottery and Raffle Act, see section 9-401.
  • Nebraska Pickle Card Lottery Act, see section 9-301.
  • Nebraska Small Lottery and Raffle Act, see section 9-501.
  • State Lottery Act, see section 9-801.

Annotations

  • Bowling alley open to the public on the payment of a fee and operated under the name of "Recreation Club" is not exempt from the provisions of an ordinance providing for license passed under the authority of this section. State ex rel. City of Friend v. Friend Recreation Club, 123 Neb. 740, 243 N.W. 876 (1932).

  • City cannot prohibit sale of card tables in places of business, nor card playing under all circumstances. In re Sapp, 79 Neb. 781, 113 N.W. 261 (1907).

  • Power was conferred on cities of second class to regulate billiard and pool halls. State ex rel. McMonies v. McMonies, 75 Neb. 443, 106 N.W. 454 (1906).

  • Validity of ordinance can be questioned only by one whose rights are directly affected thereby. Flick v. City of Broken Bow, 67 Neb. 529, 93 N.W. 729 (1903).

  • Ordinance to regulate closing of saloons relates to general welfare and is authorized under the police power of the city. Ex parte Wolf, 14 Neb. 24, 14 N.W. 660 (1883).

  • Ordinances of city of second class punishing trespassers upon real or personal property are valid. City of Brownville v. Cook, 4 Neb. 101 (1875).